Hostels

Jamia hostels remain closed after university reopens, students stay home due to financial issues

With Jamia Millia Islamia yet to reopen its hostels even after switching to offline classes, some students have not returned to campus due to difficulties in finding private accommodation.

The university had returned to offline classes for all but first-year students on July 18, and classes for freshmen began on August 1. However, hostels remain closed, with the administration citing renovations and construction.

“As everyone knows that due to the pandemic all hostels in the University have been closed so it is imperative to have them refurbished before allocating them to students as well as building new hostels for students… allocation of hostels will only be done after completion of renovation/construction of all hostels,” read a notification issued by Registrar Nazim Jafri.

While the university announced its reopening with an attendance rate of 70%, some students say the lack of hostels keeps them away from Delhi.

One of them is Aliza Anjum, a final year university law student. While offline classes started for her on July 27, she is still at home in Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh. ” My father is retired. Since the hostels are not reopening, my parents are of the opinion that it would be a serious financial crisis to pay higher rent for a PG or an apartment, as well as food and travel expenses. Since classes are now completely offline, I miss a lot,” she said.

A final year BTech student from Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh said he was unable to find any affordable options. “I lived in the hostel before the pandemic. I haven’t been able to arrange private accommodation now. I also asked my friends in Delhi to look around but many PG’s are full and many are overpriced. I have financial constraints, my father is a farmer. I just ask my friends what is being taught in the classrooms and try to keep up,” he said.

Students who returned to Delhi and were staying in a hostel before the pandemic had to make other arrangements.

“I’m currently staying in a friend’s apartment, where six of us live in a two-bedroom apartment. I can’t afford to pay the rent for an apartment myself or a PG. We have not yet received a timetable for the reopening of hostels,” said Md. Huzaifa, a final year law student.